Stoves-Cookers

The Stoves Discussion list has been sharing information to improve cooking stoves since 1996. We use this site, to keep track of the many types of stoves, their designs, and the progress that has been made to improve them, and spread efficient cooking stoves in world wide.

Use the stoves menu to narrow the list of stories to the type of stove you are interested in.

  • We are trying to (a) reduce the amount of emmisisons from charcoal production and (b) Condense and recover as much of the smoke into a usable product for your home/farm. Wood tar - the following is an explanation from the good folks at Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) about what is going on in this process.
    "The non-water component consists of wood tars, both water soluble and insoluble, acetic acid, methanol, acetone and other complex chemicals in small amounts. If left to stand, the proligneous acid separates into two layers comprising the water insoluble tar and a watery layer containing the remaining chemicals. Recovery of the water insoluble tar, often called wood or Stockholm tar, is simple - it is merely decanted from the water phase. This wood tar has uses as a veterinary antiseptic, a preservative for wood, a caulking agent, and as a substitute for road tar" http://www.fao.org/docrep/x5328e/x5328e0d.htm

    For more pictures click here

  •  Quad – 2012 to Present
    Quad Flat Assembly

    The Quad TLUD has features for easier production (using tabs and slots, and zero rivets), easier shipping (as flat-pack pieces), local assembly, and greater stability and coolness of four wooden handles that serve also as legs. Without question, there will be further improvements as the number of users increases and they provide feedback. For example, households using the Quad TLUD stoves in various refugee camps could make suggestions that outsiders might fail to foresee. Jigs, tools and methods for making flat-pack pieces are being prepared in the USA for availability to stove projects worldwide.

    Material: Sheet metal and 4 wooden handles/legs

    Cost: Mwoto and Quad TLUDs sell for approximately US$15 in Uganda, and should eventually cost less, especially if purchased in bulk as flat-pack pieces to be assembled by a local project.

    Dimensions: Currently one size, but size can be easily changed: Height: 19” (48 cm), Square footprint 12 x 12” (300 x 300 mm); Fuel cylinder height 14 “ (36 cm) with diameters from 5 to 7” (12 to 18 cm).
    Test results of Quad and closely related TLUD stoves such as Mwoto and Champion:

    CO & PM Emissions: Consistently the lowest for any of the natural draft stoves that burn solid biomass.

    Thermal efficiency: Range from 35% to 41% currently. Expected to go even higher.

    Fuel consumption: 1050 to 1600 grams for a standard WBT of cold start plus simmer (respectably low).

    Fuel types: TLUDs can utilize a wide variety of low-value chunky dry biomass fuels (e.g. corncobs, tree seed pods, nut shells), including briquette pieces that can be locally produced from unused biomass. “Stick-wood” is not a common TLUD fuel, but can be used vertically as “wood segments.” Vertical segments also with papyrus reeds, bamboo, etc.
    Options: The Quad can be made as a TChar variation for ease of using the created charcoal as fuel in a charcoal stove or as biochar that is added to the soil.

    For further information, contact Dr. Paul Anderson at: Email: psanders@ilstu.edu
    and visit www.drtlud.com for future updates about TLUD gasifier technology.

  • Reinforced Holey Roket Stove
    Holey Roket Stove - Drawing (side)
    Holey Roket Stove top view

    by Joshua B. Guinto
    Specialist, Sustainable Village Technologies

    1 The Basic Mechanisms of the Rocket Stove. With the lessons from people like Rok Oblak, Richard Stanley and the Aprovecho Institute the author began learning to build the holey roket stove in his workshop at Daet, Camarines Norte. With sheer perseverance and amidst scarcity, he was able to create several models and delivered skills training to poor people in Camarines Norte, Sorsogon and recently in Bulacan.

    2. Among the many feedbacks from the users are the limitation of the holey roket stove in terms of (1) fragility in handling and (2) capacity to receive bigger loads when cooking for bigger occasions and events and for food business. In response, one of the models was picked up for reinforcements.

    3. The Innovations as of July 2013

  • For those interested in using coconut husk (not shell)
    Unprocessed coconut hulls make lousy fuel.
    Coconut hull fiber are generally know as coir.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coir
    It is a big business in India.
    http://msme.gov.in/Chapter%206-Eng_200708.pdf
    The fibers are processed into mats, carpet backing, potting material, and geotextiles (for erosion control).
    On a small scale, the hulls can be soaked in water for at least a month and beaten to break the pith and used as mulch.
    The pith leftover from fiber production is known as cocopeat.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coco_peat
    It is generally a coarse powder. It can apparently be made into fuel pellets for gasifier stoves. See attachments.
    Bob

  • Holey Roket Stove Double-Barell as a Fish
    Holey Roket Stove as a Truck
    Prototype Holey Roket on a box blatform with a Char pocket

    See even more pictures at http://www.stoves.bioenergylists.org/Phillipines-Holey-Roket

    The first two stoves in the attached i already am making since the past years. And recently, i have been teaching women and soon their husbands to also make their rocket stoves here in the province of Bulacan under a disaster preparedness program by the Save the Children International. They also make their own designs of flowers, castle towers, chess characters, and faces into their stoves.

    the drawing in the third attachment is a prototype in process. It is a Holey Rocket Stove with a char pocket on the side and a box as a platform. I hope to finish it in the coming weeks.

    Joshua Guinto
    jed.building.bridges@gmail.com

  • A few more pictures to clarify how the Rim Fire iCan is built. It is quite simple.

    Materials:

  • Hi all many of you don´t know me, I start 5 years ago with the help of Nancy Hughes from Stove Team International and with a little help form Carlos Santana, since then I have learn some stove principles desings with Larry Winiarski, 2 years ago the Global Alliance invite me to attend the wood cooking stove forum in Lima Peru, in the opportunities brought along a hybrid stove Rocket/TLUD similar to the DK stove. and I´m working with a metal rocket combustion chamber wich will be done next week, we´ll make some KPT for 2 months before I send pictures, but tomorrow I´ll post some pictures of my hybrid metal rocket-TLUD that I made 2 1/2 years ago.

    this what I was talking about, I made this combustión chamber 2 years ago and is working good, I´m desingnig a stove at this momento with one of this combustión chambers. if someeno need plans and pictures just let me know, hofully some can make some imprivements

    Gustavo

  • Removing Handles
    Cutting the Throat Hole
    Cutting a Top Hole
    Internal Elbow
    Sheet Metal Held in place with Vermiculite

    Nothing fancy but more on the same theme

    M Trevor.

  • Dear Friends

    This is very useful.

    Save it!

    y = 4-08x2 - 0.0036x + 99.996

    X = your altitude in meters.
    Y = the local boiling point (at standard air pressure)

    If you know your altitude, it will give you the ‘standard’ boiling temperature.
    If you know the local boiling point, you can work backwards to get the altitude where you are standing.

    Excel cell contents:

    =99.996-0.0036*Altitude+4*10^-8*Altitude

    where ‘Altitude’ is the cell in which the altitude is located.

    Regards
    Crispin

  • A loaded kinyanjui type barrel kiln carbonizing maize cobs
    free fuel!
    a full kin of maize cob and branch charcoal made in less the a day
    the maize cob charcoal cooks with high heat and little smoke.

    Four very good reasons why to make your own charcoal from dry maize cobs.

    1. They are FREE!! (minimal processing required and are widely available as a farm waste product)
    2. Maize cob charcoal is very easy to make and leaves few charcoal fines. (no need for expensive briquetting)
    3. They are easy to light and burn very hot with little ash and are perfect for cooking a quick meal.
    4. Using maize cob charcoal means ZERO reliance on tree's and forests, LPG gas or unreliable and expensive electricity supplies for your cooking fuel needs. And with a Cookswell Jiko you can bake, boil, roast and toast all of your favorite foods
  • Christa Roth's excellent report
    Micro-gasification: Cooking with gas from dry biomass

    has a new location:
    https://energypedia.info/wiki/File:Micro_Gasification_Cooking_with_gas_f...

    Her comprehensive survey of micro-gasification technology has great technical information and is well worth the read.

    thanks to GiZ (the German people) for making it available to all of us.

  • Rogerio Carneiro de Miranda shared his new video that highlights the features of the Ecofogão in Brazil.

    It is is a rocket style stove that uses wood to heat a cast iron griddle and an oven. It is an efficient stove that also includes an chimney, and the option to build it into an attractive and functional kitchen island. They also have an option that heats water (for washing or bathing).

    For more information, and pictures, and to buy the stove, see their website:
    http://www.ecofogao.com.br/

  • Muhammad Nurhuda from the Physics Department, Brawijaya University
    in Malang, Indonesia

    They have developed a various biomass stoves ( Kompor Biomass ) The fuels also vary from chopped woods/twigs, pellet, palm kernel shell, hazelnut kernel shell, corncob, etc..

    And they have a nice collection of YouTube videos:

    All stoves presented above are of TLUD types, but the combustion is improved by using pre-heating and counter-flow burning mechanism. The one intended for palm kernel shell utilizes diffused-combustion mechanism, in addition to pre-heating and counter flow mechanism.

    The latest one

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b70z9-0nK6E

    is devoted for institutional cook stove or small restaurants.

    Very recently, we have also developed a new rocket stove. The combustion in this new rocket stove is improved by introducing counter-flow burning mechanism.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kID0YL6TyqA

  • New video and print resources available at www.aqsolutions.org.

    Contamination of drinking water sources by synthetic organic compounds (SOCs – e.g. pesticides, pharmaceuticals, fuel compounds, etc.) is a growing worldwide problem. Many of these chemicals bio-accumulate in the human body and cause cancer, birth defects and diseases of the reproductive system, and disrupt endocrine and neurological systems. However, few low-cost, sustainable and appropriate treatment technologies are available to rural and developing communities for SOC removal.

    Water filtration using charcoal is an ancient practice that continues today in non-industrialized regions around the world, though it has not yet been rigorously demonstrated for removal of modern industrial pollutants. Unfortunately, charcoal production by traditional kiln systems is often a resource-intensive and highly polluting process, and kiln processes are typically not optimized for production of good water filter char. Low cost, energy efficient, environmentally sustainable and scalable local production of optimal water filter char can be accomplished with biomass gasification (e.g. cookstoves and larger units using the TLUD design).

    The video and print resources available on the Aqueous Solutions website (www.aqsolutions.org) are intended to

    1. summarize current results of collaborative field and laboratory research pertaining to the use of traditional kiln charcoals and gasifier chars in decentralized water treatment that targets SOCs,
    2. provide instructional materials for construction and operation of small- and intermediate- scale gasifier char production units using local materials, and
    3. provide instructional materials for integration of biochar filtration into a multi-barrier small- and intermediate- scale water treatment systems constructed from inexpensive and widely available materials.
  • Umang Maheshwari, Greenway Grameen Infra

    The Greenway Smart Stove is an insulated metal stove, that appears to be a rocket style design with bakalite handles and a metal pot rest and fuel rest. You can see more details in the Greenway Smart Stove flyer.

    This stove is marketed as an improvement over the mud Chulha, which is familiar in India.

  • Biocharproject.org announces the stumpy biochar combination cooker.

    Its a tlud its a rocket stove it has many applications and fully customisable.
    Simple design utilises waste LPG tanks to provide safe efficent cheap cooking.

    Designed and Made in Australia by Biochar Project and Labrador Mens shed.

    See the complete story on http://biocharproject.org

    Open source free design

  • Flip and John Anderson, January, 2012

  • TLUD Workshop being offered prior to ETHOS Conference
    Hosted by Hydrovolts

  • Christa Roth, January, 2012

    To the members of the list who don't know Energypedia yet: it is an online resource created as a Wiki by GIZ . After some years of development as company-interal resource, it was opened to the public energy community late last year. No registration needed to read.

  • Dear all,

    For over two years we have been telling people that in two weeks or so we hope to have the mud Rocket Stove website updated. It finally happened. Flip has worked countless hours on this. This morning she shouted out, "The baby is born!"

    Thanks to Larry Winiarski for all the mentoring and watching over us. Without Larry and the Good Lord this would have never happened. http://www.rechoroket.com/Home.html

    Happy New Year,
    Jon and Flip

  • TChar Technology for Cookstoves: Part B: Construction has been released. It is available for download at:
    http://drtlud.com/
    The TChar is a TLUD which lifts off at the end of the gasifier phase to drop char into either a charcoal stove bottom for continued use as cooking charcoal or a quench base for later use as charcoal or biochar.

  • Dr. N. Sai Bhaskar Reddy, CEO, GEO December, 2011
    http://e-geo.org

    See the attached pdf (about 150kb): Understanding Stoves
    it is an excellent brief summary that highlights the important aspects of stoves design and testing. e.g. fuels, fuel preparation, stove design, materials, use and testing.

  • Gustavo Peña, November 2011

    Tom varios amigos me han escrito que no reciben el documento aqui te lo mando, si lo van a poner en la web por favor agregar los siguientes comentarios

    1. Està fabricada con làmina de 3 milìmetros en la parte exterior y la càmara interna es de tubo acero al carbòn de 5 milìmetros
    2. tengo varios modelos en pruebas con gente que la usa todos los dias y los resultados hasta el momento son los siguientes
    3. A- en nuetro medio un negocio comun es la venta de tortillas, una de las usuarias ha logrado producir 800 tortillas con 10 libras de leña.
    4. B- la primera estufa con 2 quemadores tiene ya 8 meses de prueba y las condiciones de la càmara son exelentes no se ve deterioro alguno, esto nos da un parametro de vida de mas o menos 4 años de uso diario.
    5. C-los usuarios que estan haciendo las pruebas estan muy contentos por el desempeño y el ahorro, pues antes gastaban $7.50 usd en gas licuado (LPG) y con este modelo ahorran $5.00 por dia con un ahorro total de $1,800.00 usd por año
    6. D- los resultados finales con relacion al peso de la leña en comparacion de estufa tradicional estaran listos en 2 semanas.

    Aqui van las fotos y los dibujos de la càmara, en el power point puedes ver los modelos que estoy produciendo, la Ecocina es la lider en ventas, al final del power point veras una estuva de metal con protector amarillo para evitar quemaduras la he nombrado HOPE y espero presentarla a una universidad de Africa en unas semanas.
    la estufa HOPE esta equipada con la nueva càmara de combustion
    cualquier pregunto por favor estoy a la orden

  • The TChar(tm) stove is a TLUD stove that lifts off at the end of the gasification stage to drop the charcoal into a T-base(tm): a charcoal stove to continue cooking with the charcoal created or a quench base to save the charcoal for biochar or other use.
    Download Part A of TChar Technology for Cookstoves at:
    http://drtlud.com/

  • Alexis Belonio, Victoriano Ocon, and Antionio Co

    Garbage-In Fuel-Out (GIFO) Project,
    Suki Trading Corporation, Lapu-Lapu City, Cebu, Philippines

    This project is a cooperation between Suki Trading Corp. and Kanvar Enterprises and the Centre for Rice Husk Technoloy (CRHET).

  • Paal Wendelobo, October, 2011

    The Peko Pe TLUD project in Zambia is going well.

    Paal describes it best:

    " The main principals for our projects I will call it community based participation both for fuel and for stove productions. Utilization of local resources with other words.. The Peko Pe is designed for production by local tinsmith with the tools they might have. They only need a template and a model; they have the knowledge how to make it.

    " First of all we discuss the need of changes, and then on the fuel side we start up with registration of alternative biomass for fuel for briquetting, energy forestry for fuel production. We always start with the fuel .to be sure there is sufficient quantities and to an affordable price.

    "The charcoal business, which represents about 15 % of the adult population, has to be involved from an early stage of the project. All kind of activities on the household energy sector will in one or another way have an influence of their business, and with biochar we don’t know what will happen, but that is one of the ting we will try to find out. Any how for the charcoal business it is just to change from charcoal to alternative biomass for household energy.

    "The energy loss by production of biochar for soil improvement is almost equivalent to the energy needed for the farmer to cook if you include the African way of thinking time is coming not like by us time is running That is a big difference. A household need about 2,7 kg charcoal a day for cooking. Form about 10 kg of dry wood you will get 2,7 kg of charcoal for one day cooking and no biochar. From .10 kg of dry wood you will get 10 kg of woodchips and that will be for 2 ½ day of cooking into a TLUD-ND. and about 2.7 kg of biochar. The pilot project will tell us if this is right or wrong."

    " A common Miombo forest in Africa will give about 3 ton wood per ha a year. 3 ton of dry wood will give 800 kg of charcoal. A household of 5 consume 2-3 kg charcoal a day or about 800 kg a year. To produce 3 kg of charcoal you need 10-12 kg of dry fire wood in a common kiln. That will give one day cooking on a charcoal stove, and almost no biochar. 10-12kg dry chopped wood will give 3 days of cooking on a TLUD-ND or another FES and 2.5 kg of biochar
    Energy forestry using just the sprouting every year can give up to 10 ton wood per ha a year, easy to cut to appropriate fuel for TLUD-ND’s or other types of FES. By adding some biochar to soil of bad quality 20-30 % increased yields can be obtained, which will give more food, more household energy, more jobs, better economy, better health for women and children and saving the forest. It can probably be as simple as this and is that not some of what we are looking for and need?
    We know some changes have to take place on the household energy sector and we have to start somewhere. Why not start with small scale farmers on sandy soil, and from there develop the new household bio-energy strategy for developing countries. Probably also with the charcoal business, they have the whole infrastructure intact and can easy change from charcoal to alternative biomass like chopped wood or pellets from agriculture and forestry related waste. "

  • Quoting "Prof. S.C. Bhattacharya" :

    Dear all,

    I would be happy to share some publications arising from the following
    activities at the Asian Institute of Technology:
    1. Sida funded Regional project: An information package (including
    construction details) on biomass briquetting machines developed in a
    number of Asian countries and design of natural- cross-draft gasifier stoves that can operate continuously is available. The briquetting machines developed
    were improvements on standard screw-press heated die design. Cross-flow
    gasifier stoves were designed for different sizes; these do not need any
    blower and can operate continuously without any smoke.

    The briquetting and gasifier stove work I mentioned was carried out under a
    Sida-sponsored project at the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT). The
    project involved researchers from 12 national research institutes of six
    Asian countries, e.g., Bangladesh, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Nepal, Philippines and
    Vietnam. The findings of the project were disseminated through national
    dissemination seminars in these countries; published "Technology packages"
    were distributed widely in the region and are still available for
    downloading from the project website. We organized technology transfer
    workshops, in which a number of NGOs form the region were invited, on most
    of the technologies developed.

    (There is no restriction on distribution of the technology packages.)

    Unfortunately, the link of the project is not working due to heavy flood in
    Thailand; AIT appears to be still under 2 m of water.

    2. GTZ funded project on Biocoal: We used the term "Biocoal" (rather than
    "Biochar") for charcoal produced from solid organic residues such as
    agricultural residues and waste wood. The findings of the project were
    reported in a book titled "Biocoal Technology and Economics" by "Regional
    Energy Resources Information Center (RERIC)" (email:enreric@ait.ac.th).

    The chapters of the 495-page book were:

    • 1. State of the art of biocoal technology,
    • 2. Biocoal technology: A comparison of options and recommendations,
    • 3. Carbonisation of sawdust briquettes,
    • 4. Laboratory-scale batch carbonisation selected residues,
    • 5. Cost and availability of selected residues in Thailand,
    • 6. Characterisation of selected residues,
    • 7.Biocoal: Market requirements and Opportunities in Thailand, and 8. Economics of biocoal production in Thailand.

    A few copies of the book are still available with RERIC. A number of
    chapters of the book were summarised as journal articles; I will be happy
    to
    share some of these with interested persons for their personal use and
    research purpose.

    Other technology packages and published papers of the Sida project can be downloaded from www.retsasia.ait.ac.th. The biomass/stove group may be interested the package on drying, which includes a hybrid drier using solar energy and bioenergy from a gasifier stove, heat output of which could be automatically controlled by using a thermostat.

    I also coordinated another regional project (Asian Regional Research Programme in Energy, Environment and Climate, ARRPEEC) funded by Sida in three phases during 1995-2005. One of the 4 projects of ARRPEEC was on biomass. Dissemination booklets of ARRPEEC and some of the papers published can be downloaded from http://www.arrpeec.ait.ac.th

  • As the United States biomass thermal and power industry continues to expand, new reliable technologies offering higher efficiency solutions must be introduced. The newly introduced EOS series biomass gasification boiler is among the most energy efficient of AESI’s high-performance, low-maintenance biomass energy plants. The EOS series provides thermal outputs ranging from 600,000 BTU/hr to 20 million BTU/hr, and can be staged to provide increased capacity.

    Designed and built by the leaders in the biomass waste to energy market in Europe, Uniconfort, the EOS series builds upon over 50 years of experience and over 4000 successful installations throughout the world. When asked about the highly efficient EOS series, CEO of Uniconfort Davis Zinetti notes, “we must not forget that greater efficiency is associated with less CO2 production. Choosing EOS, therefore, means making a choice in favor of the environment.”

  • Mussie T. (Lecturer at Mekelle University, Ethiopia), October, 2011

    This is a Natural Draft Gasifier stove, that is designed with a central column of air that is designed to burn more common Ethopian fuels, e.g. coffee husk and saw-dust (cow dung binder) briquettes in addition to more conventional wood chips.

    the air column is drilled on the surface so as to let additional primary air radially into the fuel at different stages to compensate for air clotting that can occur when run with small sized fuel as you go up from along fuel column. This helps the flaming pyrolysis from being air starved due to interlocking of fuel particles. In addition to that, closely spaced holes of relatively larger size were made near the top of the central air column to supply more hot post‐pyrolysis secondary air. The presence of two hot secondary air admission points is meant to supply enough air while keeping the stove short with reduced heat loss.

    Once the stove has enough fuel, it is typically started with wood chips, or an accelerant to help the briquettes light, and then in all of the trials it burned without smoke until the fuel tank was filled with charcoal (typically between 60 and 90 minutes later). This is a biochar-producing stove, the stove does not efficiently combust it. Friability and the composition of the char depended upon the feedstocks.

    For an excellent analysis of the stove, and pictures of the biochar, please see the included Report: Results from Preliminary Experiments Conducted on Multi‐level
    Primary Air Entry Gasifier Stove

  • Andrew C. Parker, October 2011

    Lion Cub Stove
    A variation on Larry Winiarski's 16 Brick Stove
    and Crispin Pemberton-Pigott's Lion Stove

    "I had been waiting all Summer to use my brother's StoveTek
    stove to do some experiments. While searching a reference

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